9. Detailed Instructions – Waning the Log

Feb 08, 2021

 

Waning the Log

If you’re working offline (in the forest), you can download the instructions here: Lesson 9 Waning the Log

Wane on a timber refers to areas where the sawn faces do not make a crisp corner and the live edge of the tree, with or without bark, still remains visible after saw milling.

 

Timbers showing wane.

 

For timbers this is usually considered a defect, but in dovetail log building we want a small amount of barkless wane on our logs for two reasons.  Firstly, it gives the wall a more traditional, organic appearance. Secondly and more importantly, it is needed to create an inset for the chinking to nest against.

 

The chinking nests into the waned corners of the timbers, inset from the faces of the logs.

 

We typically wane each log as we build but you can also pre wane a number of logs before you get started. A drawknife is used to remove the bark and carve the waned profile. Attempt to create a varying, ‘wavy’ edge for a more natural look instead of a uniform chamfer.

 

Listen to the log and switch peeling direction as necessary to suit changes in the grain orientation. This will result in a smoother finish and help to prevent corner breakout.

 

 

If you’re working offline (in the forest), you can download the instructions here: Lesson 9 Waning the Log